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Travel // Of life and “death” at California’s Furnace Creek golf course and resort (golftripx.com)

On the “Out There” spectrum, charting somewhere between Remote and The Surface of Mars, Death Valley, Calif., idyllically leans toward the latter. For literally millions of reasons.

The largest park in the contiguous United States at 3.4 million oft-otherworldly acres, Death Valley’s psychedelic spread of mountains and dunes, colored with the full palette of the crayon box, has proven a forever destination for adventurers, gold hunters, artists, nature seekers and family RV trips.

Not to mention the sportsman.

While most travelers are wont to tow tents, dune buggies or bikes in lieu of clubs, Death Valley offers some stellar life for the intrepid golfer.

With roots dating to a three-hole loop built in 1927, Furnace Creek Golf Course plays as the world’s lowest-elevated course, at 214 feet below sea level. It’s perhaps apt that the track’s most modern iteration was re-worked by Perry Dye, whose famed father, of course, once quipped, “The ardent golfer would play Mount Everest if somebody put a flagstick on top.”

The depths of elevation are more than a novelty, however, just as the destination is far from mere drive-thru territory.

Part of The Oasis at Death Valley, Furnace Creek enjoyed fruits of the resort’s $100 million renovation plan in recent years. Reinvestment across the sister-site spread included modernizing the four-diamond Inn at Death Valley, updating food and beverage across the grounds and current work on new, extended-stay cottages at The Ranch at Death Valley, located within steps of Furnace Creek’s first tee.

With the…

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